Leica M3 Needs CLA

Leica M3 Needs CLA

Over the course of a year (Jan 2017 – June 2018) I ran a roll of Tri-X through this camera, and when I finally got around to developing the film, I discovered it had a serious problem which I’d never noticed before. At shutter speeds 125th of a second and faster the rear shutter curtain quickly catches up to the front curtain and a severe case of shutter capping occurs, as you can see from the contact sheet below. Time for a CLA.

A few hours of Internet research later and I settled on YYeCamera.com. I sent Mr. Youxin Ye an email introducing him to my camera and its problem(s), and asked for shipping instructions. He responded within 30 minutes. His prompt reply assured me my camera would be in good hands. I told him I’d ship it out the following day.

Upon closer inspection, I noticed the shutter release would jam at random intervals, requiring the use of the self-timer to release. At speeds below 125th of a second the shutter curtains seemed to work fine. Cameras, like motorcycles, benefit more from use than neglect. Taking over a year to shoot a roll of film could be construed as a high crime against a classic camera.

The lens used to make these images is the Leica Summicron 5cm f2. This is a collapsible lens and when paired with the M3 makes for a compact kit, although not quite as compact as the Leica Elmar 5cm f2.8.

New Year’s Resolution: Shoot More Film In 2019

New Year’s Resolution: Shoot More Film In 2019

Happy New Year!

 

It’s no secret I’m a big fan of film, but I’m ashamed to admit I slacked off in 2017 & 2018 and shot only a handful of rolls and developed not one. I’m now faced with a stockpile of aging film and chemicals nearing expiration and I need to get busy. I need to shoot more film. 

My ambitious plan for 2019 is to select two cameras from my collection as daily shooters and carry them wherever I go, either one or the other, or, if I’m feeling froggy, both, but that might be too ambitious. In case you haven’t already guessed from looking at the header image, I’ve selected the venerable Nikon F3HP and the Mamiya C330.

Nikon F3HP


Nikon F3HP

The Nikon F3HP was an easy choice as it’s easily my favorate camera of all time. I’m upping the ante by using only two prime lenses: 1) a Nikkor 50mm f1.2 (shown attached to the camera), and 2) a Nikkor 35mm f1.4. The use of primes will force me out of my comfort zone and encourage me to get close and intimate with my subjects. I also need to build an image bank using these lenses and this will give me the opportunity.

Mamiya C330 Pro


Mamiya C330 Pro

I’ve owned the Mamiya C330 for some time, but haven’t had a chance to use it.  Its 80mm f2.8 Mamiya-Sekor lens is superb for portrait work.

Both of these cameras are hefty. In my very unscientific left-hand-right-hand scale test, the Mamiya feels more than a bit heavier than the Nikon with the MD-4 motordrive attached. My strap of choice in situations like this is the UPstrap Large Mountain ‘Hybrid’ Pad Camera Step/Sling. These are, hands down, the best camera straps on the planet. And no, I am not affiliated with UPstrap. I just like to plug companies that make great products here in the good-ol’ USA.

Kodak 400 TX

Kodak 400 TX

For film I’ll be using Kodak Tri-X 400, Kodak Porta 400, Kodak Ektar 100, and ADOX 25. I’ll schlep the film and other doodads around in my goto camera bag: a US Army Communications Peg Bag.

US Army Bag

US Army Bag

The one shown above is a reprodution. I waterproofed the fabric with 3M waterproofing spray and I carry a handful of waterproof pouches for when the weather is particularly nasty and I can’t escape the elements.

I’ll post updates and sample images throughout the year.

Nikon FM Chrome

Nikon FM Chrome

The venerable Nikon FM is a mechanical camera whose batteries serve only to power the built-in exposure meter. I usually remove the batteries and go completely mechanical. If I do need an exposure meter I use the Gossen Digisix, pictured below, otherwise I estimate exposure using the Exposure Rule-of-Thumb.

Gossen Digisix

I like the heft and feel of this camera. It’s small, balanced, and fits nicely in your hands. Its feature set resembles a sparsely decorated apartment; there’s no clutter here. The shutter speed and film speed selector share the same dial housing, its film advance ratchets smoothly, reminiscent of winding a precision clock (and you are in a way), and its shutter release fires with reassuring certainty. You can definitely feel the mirror’s moment as it swings up and down. Its report is the sound of superior quality.

Balboa Park

I particularly like this camera because I’ve owned it the longest of all the cameras in my collection. I purchased it from a pawnshop in Norfolk, Virginia back in the early 1980s when I was stationed on board the USS Norfolk (SSN 714). For twelve years it served as a backup camera to my Nikon F3HP. In the mid 1990s when I started graduate school, I sold all of my camera gear with the exception of the FM, a 50mm lens, and my Contax T.

Balboa Park

Traveling with the Nikon FM is easy because it’s small and extremely rugged. It doesn’t depend on electronics to operate. It can take a beating and look better for it. It’s not fussy and doesn’t complain when the weather is too cold, too wet, or too hot.

When I travel with this camera I pop it into a Zing camera case and go. The Zing is made of neoprene rubber. It’s like putting your camera in a wetsuit. The Zing case slips easily over the entire camera and comes in different sizes to accommodate various lens lengths. My lens of choice for this camera is the Nikkor AIS 35mm f 1.4. (Although it is pictured with the 35mm f2. Both are excellent lenses.)

Twisted Trees

I like to venture meter-free into the world with mechanical cameras and exercise my brain by estimating exposures. It’s easy to do, as is anything given enough practice. I use the Exposure Rule-of-Thumb, which goes something like this: on a bright sunny day, the base line exposure would be an aperture of f16 and a shutter speed of 1/film speed. I round down the shutter speed. For example, if I’m shooting 400 ASA film, my baseline shutter speed would be 1/400th of a second, but since this falls between 1/500 and 1/250 I select the lower shutter speed. Given the baseline exposure I am free to adjust as I see fit based on the particular needs of the image. For example, am I using a filter, or do I want less depth of field.

What you must be aware of when using the Exposure Rule-of-Thumb is the location of your subject. If your subject is laying on the beach in direct sunlight and there are no clouds then you’ll get a good exposure with f16 and 1/250. The following table lists various lighting conditions and their associated exposure values (EV).

EV

Subject in...

16

Bright sun on sand or snow

15

Bright or hazy sun

14

Weak hazy sun or the full moon

13

Cloudy – bright  light – Gibbous moon

12

Heavy overcast

11

Open shade – Sunsets

10

Immediately after sunset

9

10 minutes after sunset

8

Times square at night

7

Stage shows – circuses

6

Brightly lit home interior

5

Night home interior

4

Candle lit close-up

3

Fireworks (time exposure)

2

Lightning (time exposure)

1

Distant view of lighted skyline

I keep a copy of this table in my wallet along with a copy of the following table on the flip side:

ASA 400

 

1/250

1/125

1/60

1/30

1/15

1 / 4

1 / 2

1

2

f 16

15

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

f 11

14

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

f 8

13

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

f 5.6

12

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

f 4

11

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

f 2.8

10

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

f 2

9

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

f 1.4

8

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

f 1.2

7

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

-1

f 1

6

5

4

3

2

1

0

-1

-2

Note that this table represents an ASA 400 speed film. When I find myself waiting for something and have nothing to read, I pull these tables out and refresh my memory on the different possible lighting situations and their associated exposures. As Ansel Adams said, “Chance favors the prepared mind.”

 

Higher Resolution Images

Nikon FM Black

Nikon FM Black

The Nikon FM is a 100% mechanical camera. Yes, it does contain a built-in exposure meter, but when using this camera I find it faster to estimate the exposure using the exposure rule. If I require more accurate exposures then I’ll use either my trusty Gossen Digisix or my Pentax spot meter.

Gossen Digisix

I especially like the Nikon FM because of its small size and extremely rugged build. It fits comfortably in the palm of my hand and doesn’t stress my neck or shoulders when carried on a long day of shooting. The lenses I like to use with this camera include the Nikkor AIS 35mm f1.4 or the Nikkor AIS 50mm f1.2. These fast lenses let me shoot hand-held in fairly low light situations with my favorite black and white films: Kodak Tri-X or Ilford Delta 400.

Morning Walk

The Nikon FM is fairly quiet as 35mm SLR cameras go, but this is only my unscientific opinion. It has a nice, solid feel to it when you trip the shutter. Its winding mechanism operates smoothly and overall the camera just feels good in my hands. It’s definitely a high-quality photographic instrument.

What I don’t like about the Nikon FM is its non-interchangeable focusing screens. It’s not the screen I don’t like; it’s the inability to easily clean out stray dust particles that bugs me most. Call me neurotic, but I like a clean, speck free screen when I look through the viewfinder.

Pentax 67

Pentax 67

First impressions encourage one to hand hold this mammoth but doing so is not for the weak or faint-of-heart. If you have a medical condition, I suggest you consult your physician before carrying this camera around with you on a shooting spree.

Great Falls, Virginia

Although it resembles a 35mm SLR on growth hormones, the Pentax 67 is first and foremost a studio camera. To give you some indication of its size I’ve photographed it together with a Contax T3, but even that image fails to convey the camera’s true bulk and heft.

Pentax 67 and Contax T3

I have toted the Pentax 67 with me on several Washington, DC walkabouts. When I do take it for a stroll I use a wide, springy strap and the attachable hand grip. Due to its weight, I find myself constantly rotating the camera from one shoulder to the other or from my neck to my shoulders. This camera too long hanging from your neck or shoulder soon causes pain. I honestly lift weights to increase my strength and endurance so I can effectively wield this behemoth.

Schmoogle

I get good hand-held results with the Pentax 67 but it takes finesse. It’s the mirror that concerns one most; it generates a significant amount of camera shake as it loudly goes “ker-thwap” against the viewfinder prism. In practice, I get good hand-held images when shooting at shutter speeds equal to or greater than 125th of a second; anything below that and I must use a tripod.

I sometimes employ another shooting technique to further improve hand-held image quality; I use the mirror lock-up feature to move the mirror up and out of the way right before taking the shot. This works best when using a wide angle lens as the camera inevitably moves out of place, if only a little, in the time it takes to lock the mirror and take the photograph. I always use the mirror lock-up feature when shooting with a tripod.

The Pentax 67 system boasts an incredible selection of lenses, more than any other medium format system. My favorites include the 55mm f4, the 105mm f2.4, and the 75mm f4.5 shift.

Yashica Mat 124G

Yashica Mat 124G

Want to strike up a conversation with someone but don’t quite know what to say? Say nothing! Just dust off the trusty Yashica Mat 124G and hit the streets. In short order you’ll have perfect strangers approaching you asking what you’ve got. Occasionally, you’ll meet someone who knows a thing or two about cameras. These folks like to wax nostalgic about the Twin Lens Reflex (TLR) they used to have, or that they still own, but now sits in the closet, superseded by their new digital camera. Most of the people you meet, however, don’t rightly care about cameras. They just think it looks neat, or strange, this box-like contraption you have hanging around your neck whose top you open every now and then and look into, fiddling with its knobs and dials, and then closing again, just as mysteriously. I’m convinced. If I had nothing left in this world but this camera, by the end of the day I could secure a square meal and a place to sleep. Its allure is that powerful.

Canal, Amsterdam

I can totally see where one who grew up on 35mm and digital cameras would find a rare bird like the Yashica Mat interesting. You simply don’t see TLRs out on the streets anymore. I can’t recall ever encountering someone with one, other than myself. Had we, two kindred souls, met on the street, trusty TLRs in hand, we’d have retired right then and there to the nearest pub and bought each other a round of drinks.

Ghost Walker

Lots of professional photographers have completely abandoned film and gone whole-hog into the digital world. I can understand their motivation. Film is messy. You have to store it, bring it with you, and develop it.  Professionals are, well, professionals. They must earn their living taking pictures.  Professional grade digital cameras and Adobe Photoshop have transformed the photography business. To a professional, time is money, and they don’t have time to mess around with film anymore. But to those of us who have a little more time on our hands, medium format TLR photography offers many rewards, especially if you can afford a good film scanner.

Bridge Reflection, Amsterdam

Three things I especially like about the Yashica Mat 124G are its sharp lens, rugged build, and super accurate built-in exposure meter. I dropped this camera from about waist high onto the floor in the Heineken beer factory in Amsterdam while playing a rousing game of foosball. I picked it up, dusted it off, it worked like a champ. No dents, no dings.

Leidseplein Trashed

Most people have no idea you’re even taking a picture. There you stand, with a little black box hanging from your neck. You’re bent over slightly from the waist, like a hunchback, eye to the ground glass magnifier getting the focus just right. You lift your head, check the framing, adjust the shutter speed, then the aperture, and then, when everything’s perfect, you trip the shutter, and the only hint of a taken photograph is an imperceptible click.

Mannequins Business Card